Is It Possible That Some Baskeball Courts Are Smaller Than Others?

Is it possible that some baskeball courts are smaller than others?

Yes, definitely!!! I've been playing my whole life. Usually outdoor courts are all smashed together so they are very small because they try to fit as many courts as possible. Indoor ones like at gyms are usually bigger and more accurate because there is only one or sometimes two in a large area.

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The Iraqi Government wants to prosecute Backwater employees in their courts...?

Pulling Blackwater's license may be all the Iraqis can do. Should any Iraqis ever seek redress for the deaths of the civilians in a criminal court, they will be out of luck. Because of an order promulgated by the Coalition Provisional Authority, the now-defunct American occupation government, there appears to be almost no chance that the contractors involved would be, or could be, successfully prosecuted in any court in Iraq. CPA Order 17 says private contractors working for the U.S. or coalition governments in Iraq are not subject to Iraqi law. Should any attempt be made to prosecute Blackwater in the United States, meanwhile, it's not clear what law, if any, applies. "Blackwater and all these other contractors are beyond the reach of the justice process in Iraq. They can not be held to account," says Scott Horton, who chairs the International Law Committee at the New York City Bar Association. "There is nothing [the Iraqi government] can do that gives them the right to punish someone for misbehaving or doing anything else." L. Paul Bremer, then the head of the Coalition Provisional Authority, the initial occupation government of Iraq, issued CPA Order 17 in June 2004, the day before the CPA ceased to exist. "Contractors," it says, "shall not be subject to Iraqi laws or regulations in matters relating to the terms and conditions of their Contracts." The Iraqi government has contested the continued application of this order, but because of restraints that inhibit the Iraqi government from changing or revoking CPA orders, Order 17 technically still has legal force in Iraq. Furthermore, as Peter W. Singer, an expert on private security contractors who is a senior fellow at the center-left Brookings Institute, points out, in order for the Iraqi government to prosecute those contractors, the U.S. government would have to accede to it. And that, Singer says, poses a whole new set of thorny questions. "The question for the U.S. is whether it will hand over its citizens or contractors to an Iraqi court, particularly an Iraqi court that's going to try and make a political point out of this," Singer says. If the United States is not willing to do so because of concerns that the trial will be politically motivated, he adds, there's a new question at hand. "If we really say that openly, does not that defeat everything we heard in the Kabuki play last week with [General David] Petraeus and [U.S. Ambassador Ryan] Crocker, that everything was going great? What happens if we say, 'No, we do not think you can deal with this fairly in your justice system?'" That leaves international and U.S. law. But international law is probably out. Even before the Bush administration, the United States had established a precedent of rejecting the jurisdiction of international courts. The United States is not, for example, a member of the International Criminal Court in the Hague. (In 2005, the government of Iraq announced its decision to join the court; it reversed that decision two weeks later.) U.S. law, meanwhile, is hopelessly murky. More so than in any of America's previous conflicts, contractors are an integral part of the U.S. effort in Iraq, providing logistical support and performing essential functions that were once the province of the official military. There are currently at least 180,000 in Iraq, more than the total number of U.S. troops. But the introduction of private contractors into Iraq was not accompanied by a definitive legal construct specifying potential consequences for alleged criminal acts. Various members of Congress are now attempting to clarify the laws that might apply to contractors. In the meantime, experts who spoke with Salon say there's little clarity on what law applies to contractors like the ones involved in Sunday's incident, and the Bush administration has shown little desire to take action against contractor malfeasance.

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Chiefs Courts Ordinance
Chiefs Courts OrdinanceThe Chiefs Courts Ordinance was a law in the Sudan, passed by the Anglo-Egyptian colonial authorities in 1931. The law conveyed judicial and political powers to government-recognized chiefs in the southern areas of the country. The chief were, through this law, charged with tax collection, overseeing infrastructure constructions and administering native areas' of towns and given the authority to issue punishments upon the local population. Through this law, and the corresponding Native Courts Ordinance for the northern parts of the Sudan, introduced what would be termed the 'Native Administration' by the British colonial system.— — — — — —Why are Republicans pushing so hard for military commission trials for terrorist over civilian courts?Let's just save time and money by scratching both of them. Under the Geneva Convention enemy combatants dressed in civilian clothes can be summarily executed. No Miranda rights necessary. "You have the right to stand up against this wall. We have the right to put a slug in you. Stand by for your rights."— — — — — —Courts of criminal jurisdictionCourts of criminal jurisdiction included: Courts of summary jurisdiction Quarter and General sessions Special sessions Courts of Gaol Delivery and Oyer and Terminer Petty sessions AssizesCentral Criminal CourtThe Central Criminal Court established by the Central Criminal Court Act 1834 was replaced by the Crown Court established by the recommendations of Dr. Beeching leading to the Courts Act 1971. Court of Criminal AppealCrown courtsThe Crown Court of Liverpool and the Crown Court of Manchester established by the Criminal Justice Administration Act 1956 were superseded by the (national) Crown Court established by the Courts Act 1971.— — — — — —Courts-martial of CanadaCourts-martial in Canada are trials conducted by the Canadian Armed Forces. The Chief Military Judge is Colonel Mario Dutil. Such courts martial are authorized under the National Defence Act. Civilians with a military unit also become subject to the courts-martial system. Most commonly, courts-martial are convened to try members of the Canadian military for criminal violations of the Code of Service Discipline, which is the Canadian military's criminal code. The constitutionality of military courts-martial was upheld by the Supreme Court of Canada in R v Gnreux, but changes were mandated to ensure judicial independence. It was also determined that off-duty conduct can also fall under a court martial. Since 2014, decisions of Canada's courts-martial have been available online. Decisions of Canadian Courts-Martial can be appealed to the Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada, a body made up of civilian judges.— — — — — —Courts of Georgia (U.S. state)Courts of Georgia include: State courts of GeorgiaSupreme Court of Georgia Georgia Court of Appeals Georgia Superior Courts (49 judicial circuits) Georgia State Courts Georgia Magistrate Courts Georgia Juvenile Courts Georgia Probate Courts Georgia Municipal CourtsFederal courts located in Georgia United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit (headquartered in Atlanta, having jurisdiction over the United States District Courts of Alabama, Florida, and Georgia) United States District Court for the Northern District of Georgia United States District Court for the Middle District of Georgia United States District Court for the Southern District of GeorgiaFormer federal courts of Georgia United States District Court for the District of Georgia (extinct, subdivided)— — — — — —Courts of New JerseyCourts of New Jersey include: State courts of New JerseyNew Jersey Supreme Court (previously the New Jersey Court of Errors and Appeals) New Jersey Superior Court (including the Appellate Division; 15 vicinages) New Jersey Tax Court New Jersey Municipal Courts (including Joint Municipal Courts and the Court of the Palisades Interstate Park)Federal courts located in New Jersey United States District Court for the District of New JerseyFormer federal courts of New Jersey United States District Court for the District of East Jersey (1801-1802; extinct, merged) United States District Court for the District of West Jersey (1801-1802; extinct, merged)— — — — — —Nevada District CourtsIn the Nevada state court system, the Nevada District Courts are the trial courts of general jurisdiction, where criminal, civil, family, and juvenile matters are generally resolved through arbitration, mediation, and bench or jury trials. The District Courts also hear appeals from the limited jurisdiction state courts, which are composed of 17 Municipal Courts (which handle involving traffic ticket and misdemeanor violations of ordinances occurring within the city limits of incorporated municipalities) and 45 Justice Courts (which handle misdemeanor crime and traffic matters, small claims, evictions, and other civil matters in which the amount in controversy is less than $10,000, as well as felony and gross misdemeanor arraignments and preliminary hearings to determine if sufficient evidence exists for a trial in the District Court). Appeals from the Nevada District Courts are taken directly by the Supreme Court of Nevada. Following a deflective model of appeals, the Supreme Court of Nevada has discretion to assign cases to the three-member Court of Appeals. It is expected that most cases will be finally resolved by the Court of Appeals, from which further appeal will be heard by the Supreme Court of Nevada only in extraordinary cases. There are 82 judges sitting in 11 district courts, each covering one or more of Nevada's 16 counties and one independent city: First Judicial District - Carson City (independent city) and Storey County. 2 judges. Second Judicial District - Washoe County. 15 judges (6 family court, 9 civil/criminal court). Third Judicial District - Lyon County. 2 judges. Fourth Judicial District - Elko County. 2 judges. Fifth Judicial District - Esmeralda County and Nye County. 2 judges. Sixth Judicial District - Humboldt County. 1 judge. Seventh Judicial District - Eureka County, Lincoln County, and White Pine County. 2 judges. Eighth Judicial District - Clark County (serves the Las Vegas metropolitan area and is the largest of the judicial districts). 52 judges (20 family court, 32 civil/criminal court). Ninth Judicial District - Douglas County. 2 judges. Tenth Judicial District - Churchill County. 1 judge. Eleventh Judicial District - Pershing County, Lander County, and Mineral County. 1 judge.
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